Dealing With an Alcoholic Parent

Dealing with an alcoholic parent is never easy. They can be the kindest people in the world when they are sober and start throwing all sorts of incoherent negative baggage at you when they pick up a drink.

Although it helps to see the dichotomy as the alcohol talking, rather than the true thoughts of the parent, it is not cut and dry in every case. Some alcoholics are on a permanent drunk and suffer a great deal from personality and emotional disorders that diminish their positive virtues.

How to Deal with Drunk Parents

If you are dealing with an alcoholic mother, you can expect more mood swings. Women are generally more affected by emotion while men are affected by so-called logic. In either case, the emotional or logical reason for the drunk parent is exaggerated and irrational.

Fathers can become hypercritical over money because they feel burdened with expenses as a result of their lifestyles. Mothers can be relentless in pleading a self-pity case through bombastic rants that make them feel like victims.

The first step to dealing with an alcoholic father is to say to yourself, “My dad is an alcoholic.” If you don’t know how to deal with an alcoholic father, you will be baited into arguing with them when they are drunk and trying to win arguments.

This will only escalate the emotional battle that they are struggling with internally. You may become the object of derision, the iconification of the adversarial spirit that is operating to influence their minds with sophistry.

Alcohol can make anyone more emotional and serious about superficial things. The most light hearted joke can take on a grave and serious tone. No one knows how to live with an alcoholic father except another alcoholic.

The Solution to Parental Alcoholism

It is important to get your parents into treatment if they are drinking. You have to sit down with them when they are sober and have a concrete plan of action. You have to first get them to admit that they are not happy with their lifestyle and addictions.

If they can admit that they are jaded and using alcohol as a crutch to feel normal, this is the first step. If you can have them admit to simple weighty truths in writing, this can start the ball rolling.

Most feel hopeless to change a lifestyle progression that has trapped them in a small circle of friends and a limited station in life. Introducing them to the 12 Step program is a start that forces them to recognize the problem and to have faith in recovery.

It is then time to sit down and look at the benefits of being sober. If your drunk parent can sit down and consider the benefits when they are sober and in a good mood, they may be open to making some changes with an incentive and your pledged support.

Parents are often carrying a lot of negative baggage that overwhelms them when they don’t drink. Using a technique called mindfulness that focuses only on the positive things of each day is one method of substituting alcohol with simple psychological thought process modifications. Mistakes are part of the human experience that have to be forgotten but not repeated relentlessly.

Finally, once your drunk parent has agreed that they have interest in changing and that they are ready to join a support group, you can work out the financing. Joining a group of sober-minded people who believe in positive thinking is the most certain path to recovery. With a supportive sibling in their corner, the road is a whole lot easier.

Inpatient vs Outpatient Rehab – Guide to Choosing the Best One For You

When someone suffers from addiction, it’s important to choose a program that will help that person break free from the burdens associated with addiction. There are a wide variety of options that work differently for different people.

Addiction treatment programs fall under two categories: outpatient and inpatient or residential rehab. An inpatient treatment definition means you “check in” to rehab for a certain amount of time. Outpatient means you spend a certain amount of time at a rehab. Inpatient vs outpatient is an argument that comes up a lot in recovery discussions. Each program has different offerings and benefits people differently.

Inpatient Rehab

How Residential Rehab Works

An inpatient facility is sometimes referred to as residential rehab. That’s because you’re typically staying in rehab to seek treatment from addiction or alcoholism. The first part of rehab involves detoxification. This typically lasts a week and is the most difficult part of the recovery process.

Duration

The length of stay varies upon each inpatient addiction treatment program. Most inpatient rehab treatment programs last 30 days while others could last as long as 60 or 90 days. Your duration is dependent upon how much recovery you believe you need. There have been a wide variety of inpatient rehab models from as little to three days to as long as a year.

Types of Inpatient Programs

The most common treatment programs include the 12-step program, combination treatment, and cognitive behavioral therapy programs.

Advantages and Disadvantages

There are many advantages to inpatient treatment programs. It’s more effective when mental health disorders, such as depression or anxiety are part of the program. Inpatient rehab is more effective for patients addicted to drugs who also suffer from severe mental illness such as Bipolar disorder, borderline personality disorder, Cyclothymic disorder, or Schizophrenia.

One of the biggest disadvantages to an inpatient program is that you cannot leave the premises. You have to eat there and sleep there. The environment dictates your entire schedule. You can only leave the premises for your job during treatment. Also, inpatient rehab may or may not be covered by insurance.

Outpatient Rehab

What Is Outpatient Treatment?

When it comes to inpatient vs outpatient rehab, outpatient rehab allows you to live your life as you normally would. You can attend meetings and treatment programs when you’re available. Outpatient programs offer patients the flexibility to recover while living their lives. Some outpatient rehabs offer detoxification, but there are many that don’t. This process may take place at a hospital or inpatient rehab facility.

Duration

Most of these programs may have a 20-hour minimum requirement, conducted over a few days. Individual and group therapy sessions can last several hours at a time, more than one day per week. These sessions may last two hours per day, three times per week, to four hours per day, six days per week, with breaks in between. Some outpatient programs last for three to five weeks while others require a 90-day commitment.

Types of Outpatient Programs

Outpatient treatment programs may consist of counseling services, 12-step meetings, recovery training, and relapse prevention strategies. Counseling may be individualized or may involve group counseling, marriage counseling, or family counseling. Other types of services may include cognitive therapy, open-ended discussions, peer group support, professional psychotherapy, and vocational counseling.

Advantages and Disadvantages

The inpatient vs outpatient treatment argument proves both have striking differences. Outpatient rehabs are desirable because patients can come and go as they please. They don’t have to quit their jobs or rearrange their schedules. Outpatient treatment programs are less expensive than inpatient programs and are sometimes covered by government insurance or private insurance.

One major disadvantage to outpatient treatment is that patients are responsible for getting to their meetings and programs on time. They have greater access to substances, stress, and triggers that could lead to relapse since they return to their home environment. Having less structure gives them more freedom and time on their hands.

Choosing the Right One

It can be hard to make the right decision when it comes to your recovery. There are many advantages and disadvantages when it comes to choosing inpatient vs outpatient drug rehab. Not every patient will need inpatient care while others may not be qualified for outpatient rehab. Overcoming addiction means making a serious commitment, so choose a program that’s focused on you and your recovery.

Alcohol and Depression – Does Alcohol Make You Depressed

If you suffer from depression, eliminating alcohol may be a great start to a more productive and fulfilling life. Alcohol can exacerbate the effects of depression to the point where you may become crippled from being able to perform any daily function. It might even reach the point where you should seek professional treatment.

What is Depression?

Depression is a mood disorder that can greatly disrupt your daily life. You might feel a bit low or sad on occasion. This is not depression. If you feel hopeless and sad nearly every day paired with difficulty sleeping, functioning or eating, you could have a depressive disorder or you might be clinically depressed. If you lose interest in spending time with your family or friends and no longer find enjoyment in activities you once found pleasurable, you should speak with a professional. Also if you find it difficult to get out of bed and go to work each day, you could be in trouble.

The Association Between Alcohol and Depression

Alcohol typically makes depression worse by creating a domino effect of negative consequences in your life. You may start drinking alcohol more frequently as a way to self-medicate your depression. You might start drinking more with greater frequency to numb the pain even further. As this cycle continues, you will begin to avoid things you once enjoyed to drink, such as going to the gym or socializing. This will eventually begin to affect your work and your depression will worsen.

Advantages of Sober Living

After you stop drinking alcohol, you will receive nearly endless benefits. To begin, you will significantly increase your energy as you will no longer be experiencing booze-infused restless nights. Your skin will start to look amazing since alcohol is no longer devoiding your skin of hydration. You could lose weight. And your health will thank you. A few areas in which your health will likely improve are less risk of various cancers, less risk of heart disease, improved liver function and a better sex life.

Alternative Activities to Drinking

Some people need distractions to keep from drinking, and that is perfectly fine. You might find it challenging in the early days to find alternative activities to do, particularly once you realize just how much of your life revolved around drinking. One of the best alternative activities is to exercise. You may have to start small with a few short walks a week; however, push yourself to do more each week and you will feel amazing in no time. You should seek out local group activities, and take an interest in new hobbies, such as learn a specific dance, become fluent in a new language or perfect the art of baking.

Treatments for Alcohol Abuse

Alcohol and depression can ruin your life; however, you can take steps to prevent disaster from striking. You might join local meetings, such as a 12-step program, to speak with other people who are going through the same situation. You can also seek outpatient or inpatient rehabilitation programs. These will cost money and you may have to take time off work; however, they are typically quite effective, and your insurance or employer might pay for it.

Additional Ways to Fight Depression

If you are depressed, it is important to seek help. You should speak to your doctor, and they will advise you of the best way to move forward. You can also join a support group, go to weekly therapy, take prescription medication or go to a treatment facility.

Depression is a serious matter, and alcohol can make it worse. You should immediately speak with a medical professional, family member, religious or spiritual leader or another trustworthy person if you ever have thoughts of suicide.

What to Expect From a Recovering Alcoholic

If you have someone close to you, a friend or family member, who is striving to recover from alcoholism you need to understand a few things. There is a reference made that they will hear all-too-often that you should also appreciate. Realize first that the question of what does a recovering alcoholic go through to have as many answers as there is alcoholics.

There is one important thing to remember when you ask yourself what to expect from a recovering alcoholic. It’s often best to understand that sometimes there are no concrete answers.

The disease of alcoholism is cunning, baffling and powerful, and ultimately, patient as well. Here are two things, though, that you can expect from a recovering alcoholic. If you as a supportive friend or family member can learn to appreciate these things, you can help the alcoholic to do the same.

Isolation and Self Loathing

Many alcoholics tend to isolate during periods of active drinking. This problem can compound itself when they first attempt to get sober. Try not to overwhelm someone who is new in alcohol addiction recovery with an over sense of compassion. As many programs insist, keep it simple, especially at first.

This tendency to isolate may be the result of a sober sense of guilt for wrongs they have done during their drinking. What you can expect from a recovering alcoholic, once they commence to working through a 12 step program is growing peace.

As they learn how to come to terms with what was once an overbearing sense of a guilty conscience, you will notice an opening up of their emotions. Early recovery may involve a seeming tendency to isolate into seemingly constant meetings.

If an alcoholic has been through a treatment program, they may also be wise to consider a period living in a sober environment. While there is nothing like guaranteed sobriety, taking advantage of a sober living house can make a difference. Be mindful, this is all part of recovery.

Recovery is a long process. The road will certainly have a few painful challenges, but it is road founded on progress not perfection. Recovery is not some point or destination. It is a journey, and a delightful one for those who continue successfully along its path.

Isolating because of a guilty conscience or self-loathing will evaporate. Those who are not alcoholic may ask at 5 months sober and what to expect from the alcoholic. Non-alcoholics often think they should be cured by now. Just remember, time takes time.

Early Emotional Challenges

There are some new things that a recovering alcoholic will be presented with. The first is how to live with life’s endless bombardment of challenges without picking up a drink. One of the hardest things that family and friends of recovering alcoholics must avoid is trying to overly express a sense of understanding.

The truth be told, if someone is not an alcoholic, they may never appreciate the unfathomable mental urge to grab a drink rather than deal with an unpleasant situation. This mental obsession is further fueled by an unexplained physical reaction that ignites in an alcoholic almost as soon as that first sip crosses their lips.

Casual drinkers understand that life is full of challenging opportunities. However, an alcoholic may have self-taught themselves how to be artful at escaping the emotional challenges that come with everyday life. These challenges will get easier as recovery progress. Soon, situations that used to baffle the alcoholic will no longer.

These are two things to expect from an alcoholic in early recovery, or in some respects, one who has been part of a program for a while. Each person must find their own journey in recovery. It is helpful to have the support of family and friends.

This help will prove most fruitful if it appreciates these two important things. Just the inherent wreckage that alcoholics produce as a result of their drinking may cause a tendency to isolate. Be kind and appreciative of these feelings, especially during early recovery from alcoholism.

Recovery is a fresh new start into learning how to deal with life on life’s terms. Be gentle with a recovering alcoholic like you would a child just learning to walk. Besides, it’s a pretty accurate analogy.

Yoga For Addiction Recovery – 5 Reasons Why It Helps

Recovering from addiction is a long, difficult road. It requires support, self-control, finding methods that work for you, and usually avoiding the drug altogether. There will always be hard days when you are recovering, but by finding methods that help you, you can be successful. One beneficial way that will help with your addiction recovery is to do yoga.

5 Reasons Yoga Helps with Addiction Recovery

Yoga has many health and wellness benefits, but most people don’t know that yoga for drug addiction is very beneficial to a recovering addict. Working out in any way or taking on a new hobby, yoga included, can focus your brain on things other than your addiction. There are several reasons for this link between yoga and drug addiction.

1. Learn to calm down without using alcohol or drugs

Through yoga, you can learn to calm down without using these substances. This not only makes you more aware of yourself and your feelings, but it also can ease negative overthinking.

2. Yoga helps with anxiety and depression

For a long time, yoga has been known to ease anxiety and depression. Depression is a huge part of the recovery process, especially early on. With depression also comes the urge to use drugs or alcohol. By easing the depression through yoga, you may be more likely to avoid the use of drugs or alcohol.

3. It helps ease stress

Many times, addicts say they began to use drugs or alcohol because they were stressed and it helped with that. Yoga can do the same effect but in a healthier way. Between the calming effects of yoga and the stretches that take away tension, your stress will be significantly lower.

4. Helps with alcohol detox

When you are trying to detox from alcohol, calming yourself with alcohol detox meditation can be beneficial. It allows you to rest, refocus your thoughts, and calm the feelings that come with the detox process.

5. Yoga helps refocus the mind on something positive

When you are thinking about drugs or alcohol or constantly thinking about your sobriety, it can actually be hard to stay clean. Yoga takes a nice amount of focus, and it also calms your thoughts. You will be able to focus your mind on the yoga and the poses you are doing instead of constantly thinking about your sobriety.

Sober Living Arizona

At Carla Vista Sober Living Scottsdale AZ, you will find everything you need to recover from addiction to drugs or alcohol. It is difficult to recover when you are around people who still use, so sometimes sober living homes in Mesa AZ are better for your recovery.

Since drug addiction actually occurs in the brain, it can be hard to say no if a drug is nearby. Your brain has been trained to believe that the drug is required for living. It is more than just trying to refrain from falling back, as your brain is likely telling you that the drug is necessary. Sober living Scottsdale may be beneficial because the drugs and alcohol will not be as easily accessible. There won’t be people partaking, decreasing your chances of using again.

By putting yourself in a place where triggers are not as common, you may be more successful in your recovery. This may also mean that you will be able to live a more normal life in society when you are ready to move out of the sober living home.

Final Thoughts on Yoga for Addiction Recovery

Yoga is beneficial to addiction recovery in so many different ways. By taking on a healthier hobby, your body will be able to focus on something other than the drugs or alcohol you were addicted to in the past.

By choosing sober living, you are also giving yourself more of a chance to stay sober. You will be able to focus on staying clean without unnecessary triggers and bad influences. You will likely attend meetings where you will get encouragement and support from those who have struggled in the past.

Between the yoga and the sober living, you will be feeling like yourself in no time. You will be happier, more driven to succeed, and healthier.



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